What do we do when we find ourselves in a spiritual desert, where disappointment seems to consume theology and hope, leaving you confused with God? Solomon tells us four ways to respond when disappointment leads us to be confused with God.

We are to draw near to God. The direction of our feet marks the direction of our lives. So if our feet are directed towards success, money, family, fame, etc., then that is the direction our lives will move in. But, these directions end up leading nowhere, leaving us empty. Our feet should be pointed towards the House of God, the place where we are connected with God, the place where the propitiation for our sins takes place, Jesus Christ. When confused, some turn their hearts, and many turn their feet. We can’t believe the lie that punishing God with our absence will serve us, but rather we ought to keep our feet pointed to God even when we are confused.

We are to draw near to God, ready to listen. It is natural to vent when we are frustrated; the practice seems cathartic. Just like when a child angrily vents to a parent, it can be painful and damaging when we vent to God. We don’t get to come to God on our terms; we come on His. God speaks, we listen with the intent to obey, and, when frustrated, we read His Word before we vent our souls.

We are to draw near to God, being careful with our words. God is not our verbal punching bag. No emphasis on graces justifies maligning God’s character. Just as dreams feature lots of empty movement, so a fool’s mouth vents empty words. When we hear God’s Word, we should commit to obey. God loves to hear our prayers, He wants us to come to Him when we are mixed up and frustrated, but He tells us to remember that He is in heaven above the loom, able to see the beginning from the end, and we are under the loom able only to see knots. Let’s choose our words carefully.

We are to draw near to God with reverent fear. Unlike lots of words and dreams, God is both real and consequential. Unlike every other fearful thing that we run from to avoid the risk, the only way to avoid the risk of God’s wrath is to run to Him. When Jesus died on the cross, the curtain in the Temple was torn in two, giving access to all who would trust in Him. The Temple served as a pointer to Jesus Christ. He is the place where we connect to God. He is the high priest who mediates. He is the propitiation who laid down His life for our sin.

“The Old Testament temple was intended to point everyone to Jesus Christ. In Jesus, there is a meeting place where we get to be with God. He is the great high priest who teaches us, prays for us, and He is the propitiation!” – Brian Frost

 

SERMON NOTES

  1. Draw near to God. (Ecclesiastes 5:1) 

    1. Matthew 15:8 — The journey when we begin frustration with God includes similar actions as before, but our heart is a million miles away.

  2. Draw near to God ready to listen. (Ecclesiastes 5:1) 

    1. 1 Samuel 15:22 — Before we offer anything, we should listen to God to learn what to bring. 

  3. Draw near to God being careful with your words. (Ecclesiastes 5:2-6) 

    1. Job 23:3-4 — Job in his frustration wanted vent to God, and God responded with 77 questions Job couldn’t answer proving Job was out of his weight class.

  4. Draw near to God with reverent fear. (Ecclesiastes 5:7) 

    1. Hebrews 10:19 — The Old Testament temple was intended to point everyone to Jesus Christ. In Jesus, there is a meeting place where we get to be with God. He is the great high priest who teaches us, prays for us, and He is the propitiation!

 

INTROSPECTIVE QUESTIONS 

  • When you are confused, are you facing God? 

  • Do you come to God with an open Bible? 

  • How can we carefully express our highs and lows to God? 

  • Have you come to Christ in faith? 

 

CLOSING THOUGHTS

Pray. Have a time of confession. Have a time of meditation. Have a time when you pray and confess Jesus as your Lord and Savior, Through pandemics, riots, etc., let’s always choose to look to Him.

 

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