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Culture Connection — A Family Ministry Resource

April 19, 2024

Tween’s Most Used Slang Words – According to Them

Trying to keep up with tween slang might just be the cringiest thing for all parties involved. It’s an awkward ride that often leaves adults asking, “what did they just say?!” It’s easy to get lost in a sea of “bruhs,” “slays,” and “bussins,” especially when 11-year-olds laugh at you for using it wrong. YPulse asked tweens what their most used slang words are in 2024 so brands can emerge with a newfound understanding of the youngest of consumers. Here are the 10 most-used slang words among tweens right now—according to them:

  • Bra / Bro / Bruh
  • Cap
  • Slay
  • Cool
  • Rizz
  • Sus
  • Bussin
  • Wassup
  • Lit
  • Yo

 

This week’s Culture Connection comes from YPulse. They are a company that provides research content to companies and organizations with strategic insight on how to reach the next generation. Their stated purpose is to fully and completely understand what the world looks like from the perspective of young people, demystifying youth for brands.

April 12, 2024

Absent Minded

What it is: Data from the American Enterprise Institute found that during the 2022-2023 school year, 26% of students met the definition of “chronically absent,” meaning they missed ten percent or more of the school year. 


Who it impacts: The AEI data shows a 75% jump in chronic absenteeism from pre-pandemic baseline attendance rates. This trend of chronic absenteeism has educators worried that middle and high schoolers nationwide are disengaged from the learning process. This increase in student absences is hitting schools in high poverty districts the hardest, but it’s happening everywhere. It’s possible that COVID school closures made school feel more optional, reordering the way that students, and their families, see in-person class time on their list of priorities. It’s also possible that these absentee rates are related to the spike in behavioral problems educators have observed since 2021.

This week’s Culture Connection comes from The Culture Translator, a weekly email sent by Axis. Axis exists to build lifelong faith by helping parents and caring adults talk with their kids about what they otherwise wouldn’t, one conversation at a time. You can subscribe to this resource here.

March 29, 2024

Babysitter’s Snub

What it is: Babysitting, once seen as a rite of passage for young girls, is on the decline in the US.

Why it’s happening: The Atlantic suggests two main reasons that fewer young people are racking up babysitting hours as their first independent source of income. First, the rise of what’s known as intensive parenting—a philosophy that micromanages kids’ time for maximum learning, education, and enrichment, leaving little kids and their would-be-sitters with precious little idle time left over. The second reason implicates society, in general, as Americans have grown more suspicious, more risk-averse, and less community-oriented, meaning parents might not know any teens they trust enough to ask to watch their kids during a night out. 

This week’s Culture Connection comes from The Culture Translator, a weekly email sent by Axis. Axis exists to build lifelong faith by helping parents and caring adults talk with their kids about what they otherwise wouldn’t, one conversation at a time. You can subscribe to this resource here.

March 22, 2024

FAFSA Fail

What it is: An attempt to make the FAFSA form easier to complete has resulted in chaos and delays.

Why it’s holding families up: If your teen has been waiting to hear back on their federal financial aid application, they are far from alone. In the past, most colleges expected that their incoming class of freshmen would make a commitment by a deadline of May 1. But this year, many college seniors do not yet have the information they need to make an informed decision—specifically, the financial aid estimate from the US government. Without this estimate, many students are still unclear on whether or not they can actually afford the college they would like to attend. Some colleges are extending their deadlines while students wait in limbo. Meanwhile, the US Department of Education is still wading through its backlog of potentially millions of applications.

This week’s Culture Connection comes from The Culture Translator, a weekly email sent by Axis. Axis exists to build lifelong faith by helping parents and caring adults talk with their kids about what they otherwise wouldn’t, one conversation at a time. You can subscribe to this resource here.

March 15, 2024

BC Goes OTC

What it is: For the first time, a daily birth control pill will be available over the counter with no age restriction in drugstores, supermarkets, and online.

What parents need to know: This particular medication, Opill, is the only daily birth control that has FDA approval for distribution without a prescription. Opill is a progestin-only pill that costs about $20 for a month’s supply, and the FDA decided that the way it is labeled gives consumers enough information to use it safely without a doctor’s oversight. Other types of birth control pills will still require a prescription—for now. A survey conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation in 2022 indicated that consumer interest in birth control available over the counter was huge, with two in five women saying they would be likely to choose OTC birth control if it became an option. An easy-to-obtain and affordable monthly pill might further shape the way teens think about pregnancy prevention and their own sexuality.

This week’s Culture Connection comes from The Culture Translator, a weekly email sent by Axis. Axis exists to build lifelong faith by helping parents and caring adults talk with their kids about what they otherwise wouldn’t, one conversation at a time. You can subscribe to this resource here.

March 7, 2024

High Roller

What it is: Crunchyroll, a streaming service owned by Sony and dedicated solely to anime, is the fastest-growing streaming service at the moment.

Why it makes sense: In an interview with The Verge, Crunchyroll’s president explained that their strategy doesn’t seek to introduce anime to new audiences, just to capitalize on the huge audience that already exists. That’s a huge demographic: as of last year, 42% of Gen Z surveyed by Polygon say they watch anime regularly. The fan community for this type of content is diverse, and the anime format continues to push into different types of storytelling. The same survey showed that 39% of Gen Z’s anime viewers consider themselves part of the LGBTQ+ community, and over 50% of Gen Z fans of the genre said that watching anime influences their identity. Netflix and Crunchyroll are currently in first and second, respectively.

This week’s Culture Connection comes from The Culture Translator, a weekly email sent by Axis. Axis exists to build lifelong faith by helping parents and caring adults talk with their kids about what they otherwise wouldn’t, one conversation at a time. You can subscribe to this resource here.

February 23, 2024

Declarations of Codependence

What it is: In a newly published survey, Pew Research found that young adults appear to be more dependent on their parents emotionally, physically, and financially than previous generations were.

What it reflects: This report shows us how the milestones individuals use to define themselves as “independent” are evolving. More young adults are employed full-time today than were in 1993—yet about a third of young adults live with their parents. Many are choosing to delay having children (and young men are more likely than young women to say they want to have children someday). Fewer than half of adults under 30 say they are financially independent from their parents, and the huge majority of those surveyed said they rely on their parents for advice and emotional support. One in four parents told Pew Research that they even use GPS if only on occasion, to track their young adult children. Interestingly, this dependence isn’t something young people seem to be resentful of; 82% of young adults define their relationship with their parents, on the whole, as good or excellent.

This week’s Culture Connection comes from The Culture Translator, a weekly email sent by Axis. Axis exists to build lifelong faith by helping parents and caring adults talk with their kids about what they otherwise wouldn’t, one conversation at a time. You can subscribe to this resource here.

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